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What Them Girls Like Ringtone * Ludacris * | What Them Girls Like Ringtone

Thursday, September 11th, 2008
by Sck

Author: Jim McEwan

Click Here & Sign Up to Download the What Them Girls Like Ringtone by Ludacris
What Them Girls Like is the first single from Ludacris’s sixth studio album Theater of the Mind. The single co-stars Chris Brown and Sean Garrett and is produced by Darkchild. The song was available on iTunes Store on August 7, 2008. It was leaked to the internet on August 1, 2008. What Them Girls Like debuted at #59 on the Billboard Hot 100. The track has also peaked at #19 on the Billboard Hot Rap Tracks Chart.
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The  What Them Girls Like Ringtone  by Ludacris is currently one of the most popular ringtones in America. This is because What Them Girls Like is one of the hottest songs in the world right now. The track has performed well on dozens of music charts and is one of the top downloads on iTunes. The What Them Girls Like Ringtone is the perfect choice for your mobile phone ringtone. To get the What Them Girls Like Ringtone right now, simply click on the link below and follow the instructions to sign up. You will be able to download the What Them Girls Like Ringtone immediately and you will also get up to 15 bonus ringtones of your choice, just for signing up. Don’t wait - get the What Them Girls Like Ringtone for your phone now:
Click Here & Sign Up to Download the What Them Girls Like Ringtone by Ludacris

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/music-articles/what-them-girls-like-ringtone-ludacris–what-them-girls-like-ringtone-557491.html

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Resonator Guitars: Biscuits, Spiders And Cones, Oh My!

Thursday, September 11th, 2008
by Sck

Author: Victor Epand

More and more often these days, an instrument originally designed for one purpose or musical genre will be adopted for and adapted to a completely different area. This has been the fate of the resonator guitar, which was originally designed to be louder than a conventional acoustic guitar in order to ensure that the instrument could be heard above the horns and percussion instruments in dance orchestras. The resonator guitar, however, is possessed of a very distinct and original sound, and because of that, it has been adopted and integrated into the musical genres of bluegrass, country and blues music.

The resonator guitar, or resophonic guitar as it is occasionally called, is an acoustic guitar that uses one or more metal cones (resonators) instead of the traditional wooden soundboard. These instruments can be divided into two subcategories, these being square-necked guitars and round-necked guitars. The former are designed to be played like a lap steel guitar (with a slide), while the latter can be played as either a conventional classical guitar or as a steel guitar. In addition to this division, there are also three main types of resonator designs: the “tricone,” the single inverted cone, and the spider-less single cone.

The original resonator guitar was developed during the early 20th century and in 1927, the first instruments were manufactured under the brand name National. These guitars were of the tricone variety, which means that they had three conical resonators joined by a T-shaped piece of aluminum called a “spider” that supported the bridge. A year later, one of the founding members of National split and began his own label, Dobro. That company released a competing resonator guitar that featured a single resonator under a distinctive circular perforated metal cover plate. The bridge rested at the center of this plate on an eight-legged aluminum spider. Finally, National countered with its own take on the single resonator model. This instrument used a wooden “biscuit” at the cone apex to support the bridge, rather than the traditional spider.

This quick succession of instrument innovations occurred over the course of about five years. At the end of that time, in 1932, the owners of Dobro gained control of National and formed the National Dobro Corporation. However, with the entry of the United States into World War II in 1941, all production of resonator guitars by the company ceased for a time. Since the end of World War II, the Dobro label has passed through various hands, all of which have used it to produce resonator guitars. Dobro is currently the possession of the Gibson Guitar Company. Today, common terminology uses Dobro to refer to an instrument with an inverted cone, while National generally means an instrument with a non-inverted cone.

As mentioned, bluegrass, country and blues are the usual territory of the resonator guitar. The first generally utilizes square-necked Dobro guitars, while the latter two favor round-necked National instruments. Because both styles of guitar may be played as a lap steel guitar, this is the most common position used by artists. However, round-necked guitars may be played in the traditional guitar position.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/music-articles/resonator-guitars-biscuits-spiders-and-cones-oh-my-557497.html

About the Author:
Victor Epand is an expert consultant for guitars, drums, keyboards, sheet music, guitar tab, and home theater audio. You can find the best marketplace at these sites for  guitars, resonator guitar, Dobro ,  sheet music, guitar tab , and  subwoofers .

Let it Rock Ringtone * Kevin Rudolf & Lil Wayne * | Let it Rock Ringtone

Thursday, September 11th, 2008
by Sck

Author: Jim McEwan

Click Here & Sign Up to Download the Let It Rock Ringtone by Kevin Rudolf ft. Lil Wayne
Let It Rock is the first single from Kevin Rudolf’s debut album Into the City and features rapper Lil Wayne. The track has already peaked at #22 on the iTunes Top Songs Chart and is expected to debut on the Billboard Hot 100 Chart and Hot Rap Tracks Chart next week due to high digital downloads. A music video for the single is expected to be released later this month.
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The  Let It Rock Ringtone  by Kevin Rudolf ft. Lil Wayne is currently one of the most popular ringtones in America. This is because Let It Rock is one of the hottest songs in the world right now. The track has performed well on dozens of music charts and is one of the top downloads on iTunes. The Let It Rock Ringtone is the perfect choice for your mobile phone ringtone. To get the Let It Rock Ringtone right now, simply click on the link below and follow the instructions to sign up. You will be able to download the Let It Rock Ringtone immediately and you will also get up to 15 bonus ringtones of your choice, just for signing up. Don’t wait - get the Let It Rock Ringtone for your phone now:
Click Here & Sign Up to Download the Let It Rock Ringtone by Kevin Rudolf ft. Lil Wayne

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/music-articles/let-it-rock-ringtone-kevin-rudolf-lil-wayne–let-it-rock-ringtone-557500.html

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The Hand Drum: A Hands-On Experience

Thursday, September 11th, 2008
by Sck

Author: Victor Epand

In the digital and electronic age of the 21st century, we are surrounded by devices that can sometimes hide their true purposes beneath a veneer of hard plastic and shiny chrome. The Kitchenaid mixer, for example. When I was growing up, it was a plain white machine with a bowl. Today, it is available in what seems like hundreds of colors, some of them with names like “Gloss Cinnamon,” “Sugar Plum” and my personal favorite, “Wasabi.” It can utilize dozens of different accessories, from can openers to ravioli makers. This counter appliance has become less of a cooking convenience and more of an adornment for modern kitchen. Like so many human inventions, it has drifted so far from its original incarnation as to be almost unrecognizable.

The same thing has happened in the music industry. Some of the flashy electric guitars of today are far cries from the original, and much more humble, wooden acoustic guitar. Similarly, the modern drum set, with its lustrous surfaces and manufactured aura, is almost unrecognizable as kin to the drums of ancient civilizations. However, and perhaps fortunately, something about a basic hand drum is innately appealing to humans. This theory is supported by the fact that in spite of all the more modern versions available, many people the world over still play hand drums.

A hand drum is simply any type of drum played with the bare hand rather than a stick or other type of beater. There are many different types of hand drums: they hale from Africa, the Americas, the Middle East, Asia and Europe. Internationally, the frame drum is the most common style of hand drum. It consists of a shallow, cylindrical shell with a head at one of the open ends. This is the oldest type of skin drum and one of the most ancient types of musical instruments. Instances of it may be found in many different cultures around the world. Examples include the tonbak of Persia, the tamborim of Brazil, the Bodhran of Ireland and the kanjira of India. The frame is usually made of bent wood that has been joined together, and the drum head is traditionally made of animal skin, although today man-made materials are also used.

Of course, some of the most famous hand drums are the congas and bongos used in the music of Latin America. Thanks to the popularity of music like salsa, these instruments have become known the world over. Both bongos and congas are essentially frame drums; traditionally made of wood and animal skin (although man-made materials such as fiberglass are often used in modern times), they have only a single head. However, while bongos are small in size, congas are tall and narrow, typically nearly three feet tall, making them much larger than most frame drums. Also, the construction of their bodies is like that of a barrel, with multiple strips of wood rather than a shell of a single piece.

In the study of ancient cultures, frame drums are held to have associations with both religion and entertainment. They varied in size and sometimes had metal rings or plates incorporated into the design; a tambourine is an example of such a drum. It is worth noting that the names of some frame drums from various cultures strongly resemble each other, making it likely that the instrument was invented in a single location and spread out from that point.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/music-articles/the-hand-drum-a-handson-experience-557506.html

About the Author:
Victor Epand is an expert consultant for guitars, drums, keyboards, sheet music, guitar tab, and home theater audio. You can find the best marketplace at these sites for  drums, frame drums, congas, bongos ,  sheet music, guitar tabs , and  home theater audio .

Bongo Drums And Latin Culture

Thursday, September 11th, 2008
by Sck

Author: Victor Epand

Bongo drums, usually just called bongos, are one of the most recognizable of percussion instruments. Due to the pervasive popularity of Latin music (thank you, “Dancing With the Stars”), the sounds of these little drums are familiar to people around the world. Bongos, as the name implies, always come in attached sets of two. One drum is slightly bigger than the other; the larger is the “hembra” (the Spanish word for “female), while the smaller is the “macho” (the Spanish word for “male”). Bongo drums are capable of a great deal of versatility and their music is usually upbeat and rapid.

Like some other drums of the Americas, such as the steel drum, bongo drums were originally brought to South America from Africa via the Atlantic slave trade. The African nations of Nigeria and Cameroon had fraternal organizations that utilized a trio of drums called “bonko.” When the Africans were brought to the Americas, vestiges of these organizations and their traditions came with them. The Abakua is a society of Afro-Cuban men that evolved from those fraternal organizations. It continued to use the bonko drums, but the instruments eventually spread beyond the fraternity. It is believed that this was the origin of the bongo in South America. The Abakua still exists in modern Cuba and it still uses bonkos that, if joined together in pairs, very closely resemble bongo drums.

The bodies of bongo drums are usually made of wood, metal or composite materials attached by a thick piece of wood. The head is traditionally of animal skin, but as with other modern drums, synthetic materials are commonly used in modern times. Originally, in the late 19th century, the heads of bongo drums were tacked on and tuned with a heat source. But since the 1940s, metal tuning lugs have been used to allow for easier tuning.

The sound of the bongo drums is high-pitched and as mentioned, the tempo is generally fast. When played, the drums should be held between the player’s knees; the larger drum should be on the side of the player’s dominant hand, which is usually the right one. The drum heads are struck with both the fingers, palms, and sometimes sticks and brushes, although these last are contemporary innovations. The sound of the bongo drum can be muted by placing part of one hand on the drum head while striking with the other hand.

Some of the most famous dance styles of Latin America, including the mambo, salsa and conga, utilize the music of the bongo drum. The instrument’s capacity for distinct percussion is essential to these styles, which showcase distinct and often rapid rhythms. In fact, the music of the bongos is often used as a solo instrument in such music, a tactic that highlights the importance of a song’s rhythm.

On a side note, although bongo drums are generally considered instruments of Latin America, drums resembling bongos can be found in Morocco, Egypt and some Middle Eastern countries. These drums have rawhide heads like their American counterparts, but the bodies are of a ceramic nature. Such drums can also be heard in some traditional Spanish music, such as flamenco, probably due to the Moorish influence in that country.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/music-articles/bongo-drums-and-latin-culture-557528.html

About the Author:
Victor Epand is an expert consultant for guitars, drums, keyboards, sheet music, guitar tab, and home theater audio. You can find the best marketplace at these sites for  drums, bongos ,  sheet music, guitar tabs , and  home theater audio systems .


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